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My New album 'Sweet Billy Caution' came out in September- copies can be ordered from me below- here are some reviews:

This from the Mike Harding Show- don't be disconcerted that he initially calls me Si 'Barrow'. I can forgive Mike anything :)



 

I think he’s a really, really fine guitarist and an even finer interpreter of traditional and contemporary folk songs. His new album is called ‘Sweet Billy Caution’.  I think it’s a lovely album, he’s got a crystal clear voice and a simple but powerful accompaniment on the album; great choice of songs too, end of story.  [The Sailor Cut Down, album song is:]  ...totally and utterly beautiful.
The Mike Harding Show  #96  26th October 2014


Si’s voice has a very appealing tone and I really like Si’s manner, his totally relaxed yet fully committed performances exuding a beguiling brand of gentle energy that’s all his own. There’s also a refreshing quality of complete honesty to his expressiveness, which sounds every bit as fresh on each subsequent hearing; this impression is accentuated by the flexibility in phrasing that Si’s intuitive and genuinely responsive self-accompaniment affords.
At the risk of peddling a bit of a cliché, my verdict is that you should exercise no caution whatsoever in acquiring a copy of this genially undersold yet distinctly magical CD.
David Kidman- Living Tradition Magazine

see review here


This is an album where the prime attraction is the man’s voice and by any measure it’s a voice you really ought to hear... An album that has to belong in any folk collection.
Tim Carroll of FolkWords.com


I enjoyed, "Sweet Billy Caution", actually, I enjoyed it quite a lot. Si Barron comes across as an amiable young singer and one that lives in his songs.
Fatea-records.co.uk  full review here




Full review by David Kidman from Living Tradition Magazine  October 2014

Si Barron was hitherto known to me only as one half of the duo Barron Brady, in which setting his limpid and dextrous fingerstyle guitar and richly phrased vocal work ideally complements the lovely vocals of Ros Brady. Here, however, as befits a deliberately solo album – his first, I believe – we’re treated to a sequence of 11 beautifully coordinated, simply delivered first-take, virtually as-live performances (i.e. with minimal overdubs): nine are exemplary renditions of traditional songs, the remaining two being covers of more recently composed folk classics (particularly fine accounts of Down Where The Drunkards Roll and Ewan MacColl’s Prison Song). The tracklist might at first glance appear less than adventurous, but Si proves to have plenty to say interpretively on even the most well-travelled pieces (Seventeen Come Sunday, Our Captain Calls, Franklin, The Pressgang and Leave Her Johnny), while his chosen variant of Little John Barleycorn was new to me. Humour is not forgotten either, with the innuendo-rich Spotty Dick and the drinking song Come My Lads (a close relation to Let Union Be).

On a small handful of items, including the latter pair, Si augments his guitar with a smidgen of percussion and chorus vocals and he also turns intermittently (and most effectively) to the dulcimer (on The Sailor Cut Down) or the harmonium or pump organ (on the abovementioned Richard Thompson number), or whistle (on Little John Barleycorn) for additional colour. Si’s voice has a very appealing tone and I really like Si’s manner, his totally relaxed yet fully committed performances exuding a beguiling brand of gentle energy that’s all his own. There’s also a refreshing quality of complete honesty to his expressiveness, which sounds every bit as fresh on each subsequent hearing; this impression is accentuated by the flexibility in phrasing that Si’s intuitive and genuinely responsive self-accompaniment affords.

At the risk of peddling a bit of a cliché, my verdict is that you should exercise no caution whatsoever in acquiring a copy of this genially undersold yet distinctly magical CD.



Review by Tim Carroll of FolkWords.com(August 18, 2014)


"A sizeable slice of folk magic comes through the human voice. Folk’s age-old vehicle essential for storytelling and delivering the message. To hear a fine example of that vehicle revealed in a glorious slice of traditional folk listen to ‘Sweet Billy Caution’ the solo album from Si Barron (one half of Barron Brady). Here’s a voice that breathes life into each narrative the man explores. Add to the mix a considerable level of dexterity on guitar, dulcimer, harmonium, pump organ and whistle and you have an album that has to belong in any folk collection.

The album is constructed around first-take live recordings with minimal overdubs that imparts a dynamic, immediate feel. According to Si, the objective was to replicate, as far as possible, his live sound with melody and voice carrying the songs. Without doubt that’s exactly what he’s achieved, and the fact that he possess a richness of voice that is eminently listenable makes this an album to savour.

‘Sweet Billy Caution’ offers a selection of trad arr songs, the well-known and not so readily recognised, plus a couple of covers. You’ll find the familiar bucolic ribaldry of ‘Seventeen Come Sunday’ and ‘Spotted Dick, cautionary tales like ‘Sweet Billy Caution’ and dark naval practice with ‘Press Gang’. Also included is a fine rendition of Richard Thompson’s ‘Down Where the Drunkards Roll’, and a moving take on the ‘Prison Song’ by Ewan Maccoll. You’ll also hear impressively sharp guitar, perfectly placed pump organ, dulcimer and whistle. Si charts a ranging course round the folk compass, to include traditional drinking songs ‘Come My Lads’, historical narratives through the story of ‘Franklin’ and also embraces shanties with ‘Leave Her Johnny’.

This is an album where the prime attraction is the man’s voice and by any measure it’s a voice you really ought to hear."



I recorded ‘Sweet Billy Caution’ over 2 days in July 2014 and am very excited by the result. It was all done in first take live recordings with minimal overdub and so has an urgent, energetic quality. I wanted it to be a close representation of my live sound whereby the song's melody and the voice that carries it is foremost in the mix with all the harmony elements taking a supportive role.
Recording live enables me to stretch phrases and alter tempo as and when the song requires- the voice shouldn't be restricted by the harmony arrangement no matter how beguiling it might be. The English folk song music tradition is accappella so in a sense any additional harmony is adulteration- nothing wrong with that of course, but I like to think that the harmony shouldn't detract too much from the vocal melody and certainly not hamper it.

 



Copies can be ordered through my email- £11.30 (which includes p+p) 

sibarron99@googlemail.com